Does Enterasys make Wifi Extenders?

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We use 3605 and 3610 APs in our buildings. We have an AP faced out a window to push the wifi signal out to smaller building, but the signal is too poor, and we don't have any cabling there. Is there a network extender that I can plug into a wall outlet, that will improve the signal?
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Laura

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Posted 8 months ago

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Drew C., Community Manager

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I think you mean Extreme Networks  ;-)

To answer your question, I'm not aware of any wifi extenders in our product portfolio. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.
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Eric Burke

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The best way to do this is with a set of AP's on each end and a directional antenna to link the two.  If you're able to get signal there, but it's just too poor - this solution should easily be able to compensate for that.

Eric
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Eric Burke

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As a side note, wifi extenders effectively cut in half the overall bandwidth available between the client and the AP as well.  In some cases, it is not enough to make a difference, in others, it might be impactful. 
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DJ Torres

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I would suggest the same thing, a Point-to-Point link (wireless bridge) between buildings to extend the network and then your additional AP behind that.  Typically access points aren't designed to talk to each other, but to end devices. Whereas bridges are designed to do what you are attempting, which is to extend your network via a back-haul devise.
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John Romero

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Why don't you set up a mesh to extend the signal over. You put another AP in the smaller building?

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Laura

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We don't have any network cabling in the smaller building.
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James A, Embassador

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I have this exact setup - an AP in a window with mesh configured on 5GHz, an AP in the other building powered by a PoE injector that has the user SSIDs on 2.4GHz.

The user guide has the steps for setting it up.
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John Romero

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You don't need networking cable all you need is a power source ie injector and you can configure a mesh.



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Timo

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To clarify it for all, NEVER EVER USE A WIFI EXTENDER.

You place a WiFi extender at a place, where the wifi is already bad. After adding this extender it looks better. But what happens is, this extender us a bad signal with bad performance and create a new signal. This will give you less performance as without extender.

As all other write, use a Bridge or Mesh. But same for this, if the Mesh client have a bad signal, you wireless client will habe a bad signal. Although it shows a good signal, but this good signal is from Client to AP, from AP to AP to LAN you have a bad connection.
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Eric Burke

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I agree except in the case where the weak signal (the mesh / AP bridge example) is compensated for by a more directional and/or higher gain antenna.  This simple and relatively inexpensive change can make a demonstrable difference in reliability of the connection by concentrating energy into a much smaller, focused region.  As for the extender - agreed - never pays off as expected.

BigRic
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Timo

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Yes, but if I see it right, the AP3610 use diplexer radios, same antenna connector for 2.4GHz and 5 GHz. Is you need 2.4GHz as omni for client access, you can't use a 5GHz patch or directional antenna.

But for other APs you can use a 5GHz patch antenna pointed to the MESH client AP for better distance signal and a 2.4GHz omni antenna for client access.