Is there an OID to check mlag peer?

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I am trying to write a script to audit Extreme switches and their mlag peers.  So, my question is, is there a SNMP OID to check mlag peer and port?

Thanks
Damon
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Marvell Kay

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Posted 1 year ago

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Sushruth Sathyamurthy, Employee

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Hi Damon,

The master tree for other MLAG related information is 1.3.6.1.4.1.1916.1.41 where there are several OIDs for MLAG related parameters.

To get more specific - 
1.3.6.1.4.1.1916.1.41.1.1.1.1 -  The name of the MLAG Peer switch.
1.3.6.1.4.1.1916.1.41.1.2 - MLAG port table - This can give unique information about port ID, link status, etc. 

Hope this helps!
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Stephen Williams, Employee

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I'm guessing your script is going to compare the two mlag peer configurations to make sure they match and are correct.

We have a script that will check one MLAG peer (below).  If you get done with your script and would like to share it we would love that!

https://github.com/extremenetworks/ExtremeScripting/tree/master/EXOS/Python/mlag_config_check
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Marvell Kay

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Thank you both for you great response.  I am actually auditing Extreme switches and saving info in DB.  I am able to get all information and now I can also get mlag peer switch name.

For mlag port, is there an OID to just look for ports that are in ISC vlan (always has 4000 tag)?  When I use above OID for mlag ports, it is list all mlag ports including host mlag ports.  I would like to get master mlag port being used as ISC between peers.

something like: sh vlan ISC | i Tag:

That gives me what master port is configured for ISC.

Thanks for your time
Damon
(Edited)
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Erik Auerswald, Embassador

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FYI: the ISC VLAN is always tagged, but the number can be chosen freely. It is a best practice to determine one VLAN ID to use for every ISC VLAN in an organization, thus you are always seeing the same number.
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Marvell Kay

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Any updates will be appreciated.  I really want to get information using SNMP rather than logging into switch and executing show commands.  I am using Python and the only information I am having issue getting from SNMP is what master port is being used on ISC link between peers.

Thanks
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Sushruth Sathyamurthy, Employee

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The following article will give you information on using SNMP to find ports assigned to a VLAN -
https://gtacknowledge.extremenetworks.com/articles/Q_A/What-is-the-SNMP-OID-to-know-the-ports-assign...
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Marvell Kay

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I seen that page before while researching but was hoping there is a easier way.  It feels like a nightmare getting information and storing what port is assigned to ISC vlan. Even if I somehow get that info, I will them have to check "sh sharing" and find out which one is the master.

I guess I have to go the login route.  I was hoping to get that info from SNMP only.
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Grosjean, Stephane, Employee

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Hi,

Are you running EXOS 21.x or later? If so, you could rather use JSONRPC to connect to the switches and then I could give you some CLI commands to retrieve such info directly in json format, if you prefer (or you just stick to usual CLI command).
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Marvell Kay

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x870 only are running EXOS 22.x and rest are running 15.x.
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Marvell Kay

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I still want to explore and see if I can get data from SNMP.  I am trying Sushruth Sathyamurthy suggestion.  I am looking for port assigned to vlan "ISC" with tag "4000".

I am following the instructions and here is what I get when I do 1.3.6.1.4.1.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10:
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000004 = INTEGER: 1
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000005 = INTEGER: 4095
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000010 = INTEGER: 4094
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000011 = INTEGER: 4093
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000012 = INTEGER: 4092
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000013 = INTEGER: 4091
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.1.2.1.10.1000014 = INTEGER: 4000
I now know that "1000014" is assigned to ISC vlan since it has tag 4000.

Following the article, I then ran this OID 1.3.6.1.4.1.1916.1.2.6.1 and got this:
(I removed all other lines and just kept lines with 1000014)
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.6.1.1.1.1000014.3 = Hex-STRING: 80 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.6.1.1.2.1000014.3 = Hex-STRING: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.1916.1.2.6.1.1.3.1000014.3 = Hex-STRING: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
I am lost after this step.  Article shows values with 0x3F but all I am seeing is bunch of 0s.  Do you guys know how to interpret this and get info regarding what port is assigned to ISC vlan?

I saw a page asking for MIB downloads.  Do I need to download those to get proper info?  If so, where do I put that file?
(Edited)
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Erik Auerswald, Embassador

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You can use the MIB to find out what each OID stands for (by looking at the descriptions resp. comments in the MIB file). Sorry, but I do not know how to interpret the output and do not have the MIB file handy.

The place where your application or SNMP library expects to find a MIB file depends on the application / library and is often configurable. Adding the MIB file might allow your application to use symbolic names for "1916.1.2.6.1.1.3.1000014" instead of numerical OIDs.
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Sushruth Sathyamurthy, Employee

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Hi Marvell,

1.1000014.3 represents tagged and 2.1000014.3 represents untagged ports on a VLAN respectively. In this case, the hex string goes 80 00 00 00 and so on.

Here, "8" in binary form is represented by "1000". These are the first four ports (# 1, 2, 3 and 4). The number "1" in binary here for all intents are purposes is counted as "present" and "0" as not present. So, the VLAN 1000014 (ISC) is "present" as tagged on port 1 (but not on 2, 3 and 4 as they are shown as zeroes).

To elaborate further, assuming you have a hex string 3F 08 and so on, in binary it will be 3(0011), F(1111), 0(0000), 8(1000), etc.. This means the ports that are tagged on the VLAN are 3, 4, 5, 6, 11. I hope this makes sense.