Uplink / stacking link bandwidth of Summit X670-48x-FB switches

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I read through the Summit X670 product literature and specifications however it is not clear to me what the actual uplink / stacking link bandwidth is of the X670-48x-FB.

I am looking to deploy 5 separate "stacks' of X670-48x-FB switches which are separated by approximately 20-30m between each switch. The maximum stack size is 7 switches. I understand that ports 47 and 48 are the stacking ports, however can these ports be configured for 40Gbe or only 10Gbe on this particular model?

Is it correct that ports 45 and 46 are disabled when ports 47 and 48 are used to stack the switches together?

Lastly, are different SFPs (40Gbe?) required on ports 47 and 48 to stack the switches to leverage the maximum back plane bandwidth possible?

Thank you,
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Benjamin Woenig

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Posted 2 years ago

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André Herkenrath, Employee

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The actual bandwith on a X670-48x is 10GE. There no Ethernet running on the Ports when you enable stacking, therefore you need a point to point connection between switches. That's also the reason why port 45 and 46 are disabled. You can use all standard SFP+ Optics (SR,LR,ER, no LRM) as well as DA-Cable up to 3m to connect the switches.

Hope this helps
André
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Benjamin Woenig

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Hi André,

Thanks for your message, this helps a lot.

I am looking to deploy approximately 20 of these X670-48x-FB switches for video over IP transmission. The switches have already been purchased and I am concerned they may not be suitable for the solution.

Each switch will have approximately 40 video encoder and decoder devices (10GE SFP+ connections). Switches will be anywhere from 20m to 100m apart and there is a requirement to be able to transmit a video source from one room to any of the others. It seems pointless to stack the switches as we lose 2x ports and the maximum stack size is 8 switches. I have attached both a ring and a star network design. Is the star network design optimal for this scenario? Most video traffic will be contained within each switch supporting the local devices. Only single video feeds (on occasion) will need to traverse the network.

I have provided ring and star mock up topologies below:

  



Are you able to provide any further advice on this deployment?

Thanks,
Benjamin
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André Herkenrath, Employee

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according to the old rule : Keep it simple ! I would recommend the ring-design.
With EAPS, you have a protocol that makes it really easy to configure and maintain the network. You just have to consider, that somewhere in the network a port is blocked. So you have to determine the most unlikely connection and block it.
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Tony Coombs, Employee

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I agree with Andre. If you do go with the Ring topology then EAPS makes a lot of sense. With EAPS could also deploy two separate EAPS domains - Each operating in a different direction (clockwise and counter clockwise) and selectively map individual VLANs to one of the EAPS domains. This way you can decide where to have the blocked link for each EAPS domain so that all links are carrying live traffic under normal forwarding conditions. 
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Benjamin Woenig

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Hi Andre, Tony,

Many thanks for your feedback.

Taking this design a step further, I now need to incorporate an additional 8 rooms which will share 4x X670-48x-FB switches within the same rack. The distance between the main 20 "ring" of switches is far greater than 300m (the 10Gbe link length for OM3 fibre which is within the building), so I've specified an additional 2x X670-48x-FB switches to link the two locations together.

Further than this, the linking (or core switches, as I have labelled them) are each located in an individual communications room with independent power, network paths etc. In the event a comms room loses power or a core switch dies, then both sections will remain connected through the remaining operational switch.

My questions are:
  • How should the EAPS domain(s) be configured for this topology?
  • Can two separate "ring" networks be integrated together, as shown in the following diagram?
  • Can this topology handle multicast configuration as well?
If this topology is not suitable, what should be changed?



Thank you for any further advice.