Outdoor Lightning Protection AP6562 Internal Antennas

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Hi,

What needs to be done to effectively protect an outdoor AP 6562 (int. antennas) from lightning?

In the antenna guide documentation I see there are lightning arrestors that are placed in-line with the antenna for the AP version with external antennas. Is there anything that goes with the internal antenna version or just proper grounding? 

thank you in advance.
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gluo

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Posted 7 months ago

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Eric Burke

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Good morning. You'll have to install properly grounded lightning protectors on the cable itself where it enters the building. I believe that code requires them near the entrance, not necessarily where they finally terminate. You can usually find both rj45 and 110 style LP's, with or without Poe support. Some will support 1Gbps and others won't. L - COM is one vendor I've used. Another is ITW Linux.

Eric
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Vedran Jurak

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We usually use L-Com, you can find lots of models here:
http://www.l-com.com/surge-protector-cat5-5e-6-poe-camera-protectors

Like Eric mentions, the LPU needs to be near the entrance, I believe it's within 600mm of the point where the cable enters the building. For long runs or extra peace of mind you can install one more LPU near the AP. Don't forget that no amount of LPUs or ground points will help against a direct lightning strike to the AP, but it should protect the equipment behind it.
(Edited)
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gluo

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Hi and thank you both for the answers. I was also looking for a way to protect the AP itself like the lightning arrestors for external antennas do. I guess the installation should also include a lightning Rod if there isn't one nearby already. 
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Eric Burke

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We try to ground the unit itself to building steel when possible (we run a heavy gauge ground wire (insulated) through the wall to a steel beam for example). In other cases, you may need to put a grounding rod at the location. I've run into aesthetic issues with customers who don't want a ground wire running in front of a building, but it is a best practice (at least as I've been told).
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Andrew Webster

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Grounding is a very broad topic.  As Vedran correctly points out, nothing will survive a direct lightning strike, so what you are looking for is protection from nearby strikes.  
Make sure any installation fully complies with your national electrical code or equivalent requirements for grounding.  If you have any doubts, consult a qualified electrician!   Aesthetics should be the least of your concerns.
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Eric Burke

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Totally agree Andrew. What I was trying to say is that you might have to get creative in making the grounding system as unobtrusive as possible. We have some clients where the buildings are a key component of the location's visitor draw. The best way to get ideas is to bring the topic up in forums like this. I've picked up a lot of interesting ideas along the way...